What Can I Eat if I am Following a Seed Free Diet?

What Can I Eat if I am Following a Seed Free Diet?

Most people who are eliminating seeds from their diet do so because of digestive problems. People who have Crohn’s disease, for example, find seeds to be very difficult to digest, and they can end up with diarrhea and extreme gastric pain. Whole seeds are also best avoided when one has flare-ups from ulcerative colitis.

The problem is that seeds are hard to digest, and in people who have these conditions, they can be problematic. Even tiny seeds like the ones found on the outsides of strawberries can cause difficulty, and it’s best to avoid even products that contain fruits that have small seeds on the outside. Rye bread and other baked goods containing seeds should also be avoided.

Another problem can be diverticular disease. This means any infection, injury or inflammation to the diverticuli, which are pouches that form in the wall of the colon. The digestive process causes outward pressure on the lining of the colon, and creates these pouches. Eventually, they become thin-walled sacs that can become infected or inflamed. For people with this condition, a high fiber diet is warranted, along with lots of water to keep the stool soft. The research doesn’t indicate that seeds present a problem for this type of disorder, but anecdotal evidence seems to suggest that they do. Often, seeds are undigested, and they could actually become stuck in the diverticuli, so they’re probably best avoided.

If you intend to adopt a seed free diet, you need to know that you will be depriving yourself of a good source of valuable nutrients. You may want to supplement a seed free diet by taking a multivitamin.

On a seed free diet, you should also avoid eating nuts. Any other food, obviously, is not a seed, and therefore is perfectly permissible. Make sure to get enough fiber, though – seeds are a great source of dietary fiber, so you’re going to want to increase your consumption of fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

If you think seeds may be causing digestive problems, consult your doctor. Make sure you get regular screenings for colon cancer as well, just in case your digestive difficulties are an indication of something more serious. For most people, eliminating seeds from the diet won’t be any great hardship, so a seed free diet is easy to follow.

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Sources:

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20500615_6,00.html

http://www.superfoodsrx.com/nutrition/ask-the-doctor/diverticular-disease-and-nuts-and-seeds-56.html

What Can I Eat when studing for exams?

What Can I Eat when studing for exams?

Top 10 Foods for the Brain

When preparing for exams the brain can use all the help it can get to increase learning ability, memory and concentration. Fortunately for test takers, numerous, well-regarded research studies have identified the following top 10 brain boosting foods to improve brain health and function.

  1. Fish—Fatty fish, such as wild salmon and sardines, contain essential omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, which are associated with improved focus and memory. In fact, the brain requires an adequate amount of omega-3 for optimal performance.

  2. Eggs—This brain boosting food, particularly its yolk, contains choline. It is a substance similar to vitamin B that helps to improve memory.

  3. Avocados—Rich in monounsaturated fats and vitamin E, Avocados promote vascular health and improve blood flow for a healthy brain.

  4. Spinach—These leafy greens are packed with vitamins C and E. These vitamins improve cognitive abilities, according to several scientific studies. In addition, spinach contains a healthy dose of vitamin K.

  5. Carrots and Celery— These two brain vegetables contain high amounts of luteolin. This compound has been shown to reduce inflammation in the brain and prevent memory loss.

  6. Berries—Vitamin-rich super berries such as blueberries, strawberries and blackberries are bursting with antioxidants. Researchers believe antioxidants help to create strong connections among brain cells, as well as help to build new cells.

  7. Apples—This flavorful fruit is a fantastic source of the antioxidant quercetin. It protects the brain’s cells from the harmful effects of free radicals and prevents cognitive decline.

  8. Green Tea— Polyphenols in green tea protect the brain from daily wear and tear. A recent study also found that drinking green tea extract enhances memory.

  9. Dark Chocolate—This treat is full of flavonoids, which have powerful antioxidant properties to improve brain health. In addition, chocolate contains the natural stimulate caffeine. But be cautious. Eating too much before taking a test may backfire by over stimulating the brain.

  10. Water—Although not considered a food, water increases brain power by keeping cells hydrated and functioning at their best. Research shows that dehydration can cause brain tissue to shrink, affecting mental performance. In fact, a study found that well-hydrated test takers scored much better on tests compared to those who weren’t.

 

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What Can I Eat If I’m Following an Organic Diet?

What Can I Eat If I’m Following an Organic Diet?

What Can I Eat if I am Following an Organic Diet?

If you’re thinking of adopting an organic diet, it could be because of ecological concerns or because you’re worried about food safety. Maybe you just want to eat healthier and believe that this would be a good way to go about doing it. Whatever your reasons, there’s little doubt that eating organic foods is better for you. Many people who have chemical sensitivities and allergies report feeling better when they go organic.

When you’re looking for organic foods, don’t be confused by terms like “natural,” “free range,” or “hormone free.” These terms actually aren’t regulated by law, and can be fairly meaningless – particularly the term “natural.” There are many things that occur in nature that sensible people don’t want in their bodies.

When you’re looking at labels, 100% organic means that the food contains no synthetic ingredients. Organic refers to foods that contain at least 95% organic ingredients. For a product to be labelled as made with organic ingredients, it has to have a minimum of 70% organic ingredients.

Organic food can’t be treated with synthetic pesticides. Biological pesticides are permitted. Sewage sludge can’t be used, and the food can’t be bioengineered. Because growing pesticide-free food is more labor-intensive, you’ll end up spending more for organic food than you would for other produce, and you may have to live with some imperfections in the appearance. However, if you can afford to go organic, and you don’t mind some spots here and there, you probably will feel better about your health.

The problem with pesticides is the residue, and some foods are worse than others. If you’re on a budget, you might want to spend your money on organic produce when the variety is one that’s particularly susceptible to residue. The vegetables and fruits that are most susceptible to residue are as follows:

  • Apples
  • Peaches
  • Nectarines
  • Pears
  • Cherries
  • Strawberries
  • Grapes
  • Celery
  • Bell peppers
  • Potatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Spinach

The vegetables and fruits that you can expect to have the least residue are as follows:

  • Kiwi
  • Bananas
  • Pineapple
  • Mango
  • Papaya
  • Onions
  • Cabbage
  • Broccoli
  • Avocado
  • Frozen peas
  • Frozen corn
  • Asparagus

By choosing organic varieties of the fruits and vegetables most likely to have pesticide residue, you can go organic on a budget. Of course, if you want to adopt a true organic diet, you will have to incur some expense, but your peace of mind may be worth it.

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Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/how-to-eat-organic-foods-on-a-budget

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/organic-food/art-20043880

 

What Can I Eat if I Am Following a Low Fat Diet?

What Can I Eat if I Am Following a Low Fat Diet?

Fat serves as an essential macronutrient in your body that assists in the absorption of vitamins. It also plays an important role in blood clotting, brain development, and managing inflammation. However, the majority of people following a Western Diet are consuming too much fat causing such problems as obesity, high cholesterol, and cardiovascular disorders.

The first step you should take in lowering fat in your diet is to avoid saturated and trans fats as much as possible. These fats are found in butter, shortening, partially hydrogenated oils, margarine, and fat from meat. Instead, the fats in your diet should consist of unsaturated fats such as the fat found in nuts, avocados, and oils from vegetable sources.

The majority of your diet should be focused on low-fat foods, including fruits, vegetables, legumes, beans, and whole grains. Lean protein sources include tofu, tempeh (fermented soybean product), and beans. Free-range, low-fat beef, turkey, pork, or chicken are also good options as long as they are consumed in moderation. Low-fat dairy products are an option, although there are plenty of non-dairy, healthier options available such as organic, sugar-free almond milk, soy milk, or rice milk.

Processed foods are one of the leading culprits of high-fat dietary habits. In general, processed foods are unhealthy and should be avoided if you want to maintain optimum health. Processed foods include lunch meats, frozen fish sticks, frozen dinners, breads made with white flour, canned foods, packaged cookies, boxed meal mixes, and sugary breakfast cereals. Most conventional grocery store aisles are chock full of processed food items, but you may find alternatives with a little perseverance. Health food stores offer alternatives, including canned foods and frozen meals that are made with whole food ingredients and that are not loaded with saturated fat and other additives.

When cooking, use methods such as broiling, steaming, boiling, grilling and roasting as opposed to frying. These cooking alternatives do not require much, if any, oil or butter. Following other dietary habits such ordering your coffee without milk or with fat-free milk or soy milk will reduce the amount of fat in your diet.

Be aware that soups and salads aren't always low in fat. Choose clear broth soups instead of creamy soups. Choose non-creamy salad dressings or, better yet, make your own homemade salad dressing using ingredients such as balsamic vinegar, a small amount of olive oil, Bragg's liquid aminos (for a salty flavour), and herbs. With a little creativity, you will find that your new and healthier way of eating does not have to diminish your enjoyment of food.

 

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What Can I Eat If I Have Gluten Intolerance?

What Can I Eat If I Have Gluten Intolerance?

What is Gluten Intolerance? 

Gluten intolerance is a malabsorption syndrome that occurs from sensitivity to gluten, a mixture of two 
proteins, gliadin and glutenin, found in food groups like wheat. More specifically, it is found in the form of 
secalin in rye, hordein in barley and avenin in oats. 

For the purpose of study, gluten intolerance is generally divided into three different categories, including: 
 Coeliac disease 
 Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity 
 Wheat allergy symptoms 

Diet and Gluten Intolerance 

Before we go any further, it is important to know why gluten intolerance needs immediate medical attention, especially from the point of view of dietary habits. There are two main explanations for this: It can lead to malfunctioning of the villi, which are small hair-like projections in the small intestine responsible for absorbing fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals for your diet.  The point at which most of the damage occurs in the small intestine is the one where vitamin B12 is absorbed. Vitamin B12 is responsible for some of the most important cellular functions in your body. 

What to Have 
You can include some types of foods from various food groups such as fruits, vegetables, cereals, proteins, and fibre and dairy products into your gluten-free dietary regimen.  Largely considered the safer food groups for individuals with gluten intolerance, you can consume the following as a part of your meals and snacks: 
 Fish 
 Eggs 
 Lean meats 
 Brown rice 
 Flour (made form arrowroot, rice, cornstarch, coconut) 
 Vegetables and salads (plain) 
 Potatoes (white/yams/sweet) 
 Rice noodles and rice glass noodles 
 Soba noodles (only from buckwheat) 
 Fruits 
 Raw dairy 
 Beans 
 Nut butters (check labels) 
 Breads and baked goods, from other flours (rice, arrowroot, tapioca, potato) 
 Red lentils and black eyed peas 
 Olives 
 Tapioca 
 Potatoes 
 Nuts 
 Seeds 
 Quinoa 
 Flax 
 Buckwheat 

Foods to Avoid 
There are certain food sources and food groups that should be strictly avoided if you have gluten intolerance. 

The most important amongst these include:

Wheat 
 Rye 
 Bulgar 
 Pasta 
 Cereals 
 Oats (if contaminated) 
 Green lentils 
 Nicotine 
 MSG 
 Semolina 
 Vegetable starch 
 Couscous Triticale 
 Durum flour 

Our tip: Since gluten could come disguised in a multitude of forms, these lists might not be all exhaustive. 
Get into the habit of reading food labels. Watch out for terms like graham flour, semolina, farina, hydrolyzed 
vegetable protein, flour or cereal products, vegetable proteins, flavourings, emulsifiers and stabilizers. These 
might indicate the presence of gluten in the particular food product as they are generally sourced from 
gluten containing grains. 

 

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What Can I Eat If I`m Looking For Gluten Free Bread?

What Can I Eat If I`m Looking For Gluten Free Bread?

Being diagnosed with gluten intolerance can become a major milestone in your life. Basically, it means more than just 
eliminating gluten from your food. Instead, it is all about changing your entire lifestyle, your food preferences and even the timings of food. Since bread forms the mainstay of our diet today, it is very important for sufferers of gluten intolerance to know the options they have if looking for gluten free bread. 

3 top choices you can make You can be rest assured that even if you have been diagnosed with gluten intolerance, you are not doomed to thrive merely on the seemingly tasteless gluten free bread for your whole life. With thousands being diagnosed with this problem, there are now a plethora of choices you can go for if you are gluten intolerant. 
Here, we list you the top 3 choices you can make when looking for gluten free bread. 

1) Get sweet breads 
There are a number of companies who are making gluten free sweet breads without the gluten related ingredients, both in premade form and as packet mixes for you to make. You can take your pick from the likes of carrot, cinnamon raisin, zucchini or banana bread to add variety to your diet. 
Search the Bread Pantry of What Can I Eat for our preferred brands. 

2) Use gluten-free sandwich breads 
Specially made gluten free bread and gluten free sandwich breads are made from ingredients such as 
cornmeal, soy, maize, rice flour, besan, quinoa and potato flour to name a few, which eliminate the risk of 
any potential reactions. Meanwhile, some of the best gluten free bread brands also use nuts and almonds for 
added nutritional value. 
Search the Bread Pantry of What Can I Eat for our preferred brands. 

3) Make your own waffles and pancakes 
For those with a taste for sumptuous breakfast and want tasty alternatives to bread try waffles, pancakes 
and muffins which are all a good option to go for if gluten intolerance is an issue. 

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Breadmachines: 
You can procure your own gluten free bread maker machine and make delicious breads using readymade 
gluten free mixes. Making gluten free bread might not be too complicated if you follow the right instructions 
and use the ingredients in the proper measure. Such gluten-free mixes are widely available in the 
marketplace both retail and online for the benefit of those suffering from gluten intolerance. 

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