The Story of Sugar

The Story of Sugar

Historically, sugar was made by pressing the juice from the cane and boiling away the water. The product retained its critical vitamins, minerals and trace nutrients. With industrialisation came new ways to employ less people and the new sugar technology was born. 

Now sugar was made by dividing the cane juice into two substances; ultra-refined, 99.6% pure sucrose and nutrient-dense molasses which was fed to animals. The sucrose portion is easily dried, stores for longer, pours easier and transports easier, making it more economical in terms of human labour and wastage. Modern manufacture of sugar from cane juice also employs a potpourri of chemicals such as sulphur dioxide, lime, phosphoric acid, bleaching agents & viscosity reducers. 

This new type of sugar was marketed well. 

It was white, a very important colour to the growing western middle class mid-last century. To have white goods, white flour, and white sliced bread, white gloves was the height of social success. By the mid 1950s it was considered shameful if your mother made her own brown bread or you had an old-fashioned icebox. Unfortunately white sugar – any refined sugar – creates havoc within our bodies and like anything refined, it is highly addictive. Once refined, sugar is no longer a food, it is a drug. And today, most of the western world is addicted. (One wonders if the supermarket chains would stay in business without pushing it.) 

Rapadura along with a traditional Indian 
medicine called Jaggery, are the only sweeteners made from sugar cane that are not refined. 
They are squeezed, dried, and ground, that’s it. The juice is not separated, dried and then reunited with its more nutritious counterpart (molasses) in artificial proportions, as are raw, brown and black sugar, 

Demerara and sucanat. 
Rapadura delivers vitamins, minerals and other trace elements as well as the sweet taste that all humans desire, and need. We have sweet taste buds for good reason. Sweet foods in nature provide us with high quality vitamins and minerals, especially magnesium. As long as we balance the sweet taste with the other four (sour, bitter, salty and pungent), according to Chinese medicine, we will maintain good health. 

Using unrefined sweeteners like honey, dehydrated cane juice, agave, maple syrup and palm sugar will help bring your sugar addiction under control, as they don’t behave like drugs in the body. However, you’ll still need a little help from your mind to rebalance your body’s innate desires. It helps me to imagine the amount of effort needed to grow, harvest and process the sweeteners I eat. Living in tribal or even semi agrarian society, how much time would be allocated for providing this food? I’ve estimated that sweeteners should be eaten around 3 times a week at most to replicate ancient food ways and I’m guessing that’d be best for my body too. What do you think? 

Rapadura is made from organically grown sugar cane from Colombia and Brazil through fair trade programs. For this reason it is more expensive than other sugars which degrade our soils, our water, and our bodies not to mention the standard of living of the 3rd world farmers who grow the stuff. It’s worth it to buy Rapadura from your local health food shop. You can buy it in bulk or packaged, in chocolate (Rapunzel) or drinks (Santa Cruz soft drinks), even the Ozganics range of sauces have dried cane juice. Use it by substituting 1 for 1 with raw sugar in recipes using whole foods such as eggs, butter, cream and other whole milk products, nuts, coconut, arrowroot, fruit and eat the result knowing you are eating a whole food. It tastes mildly like toffee due to the molasses content. 
You can order Rapadura in bulk from Santos Trading. As far as I know, Jaggery is not yet available in 
Australia.

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Using Less Sugar and Sweeteners

Using Less Sugar and Sweeteners

Tips for how to reduce sugar in your diet and make room for more nutritious foods 
Read ingredient labels. If sugar is listed as the first, second or third ingredient, and the product probably contains a large amount of sugar as a sweetener. Identify all the sugars in a product (sucrose, honey, glucose, molasses, dextrose, corn sweetener, fructose, high-fructose corn syrup, lactose, maltose, sorghum syrup, mannitol, fruit juice concentrate, sorbitol). Select items lower in added sugars when possible. 

Eat whole fruit instead of fruit juices- even 100% fruit juice is high in natural sugar.  Buy fresh fruits or fruits packed in water, juice, or light syrup rather than those in heavy syrup. Buy fewer foods that are high in sugars such as soft drinks, fruit-flavoured punches and sweet desserts. Be aware that some low-fat desserts may be very high in sugar. Limit Gatorade, PowerAde, Vitamin Water and other power drinks that are also high in sugar Add less sugar to coffee, tea, cereal or fruit. Get used to half as much, and then see if you can cut back even more. 

Use less sugar in the foods you prepare at home. Try new recipes or adjust your own. Start by reducing sugars gradually until you`ve decreased them by one third or more. As you reduce the sugar in your baked goods, try adding spices like cinnamon, cardamom, coriander, nutmeg, ginger and mace to enhance the sweet flavour of foods. Spiced foods will taste sweeter if warmed. Don’t skip meals- this may cause a sugar craving 
 
Here`s a guide for baking with less sugar: 
For every cup of flour, use only: 
 
Cakes and cookies: 1/2 cup sugar 
 
Muffins and quick breads: 1 tablespoon sugar 
 
Yeast breads: 1 teaspoon sugar 
 
Don`t worry – sugar isn`t your enemy. But reducing your sugar intake will help you cut calories and will 
allow you more room for more nutritious foods. 

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46 Sneaky Names for Sugar

46 Sneaky Names for Sugar

There are more than 200 types of added sugar used in processed food and beverages.  Added sugars are used in more than 75% of the products sold in supermarkets – often in unexpected items, like bread, salty snacks and condiments.

 

Beating that Sweet Tooth

Beating that Sweet Tooth

Sugar has become hard to avoid for many of us. It is hidden in many packaged foods and easily creeps in excessive amounts into our daily diets. A diet high in sugar can contribute to weight gain, diabetes, chronic fatigue, headaches, hormonal problems and mood disturbances. 
 
Four Types of Sugar Addiction 
 Needing sugar for an energy boost 
 Using sugar to elevate mood and deal with stress 
 Craving sugar due to a yeast overgrowth (yeast feed on sugar) 
 Managing hormonal imbalances with sugar e .g. Pre-menstrual craving) 
 
Here are some tips for cutting out sugar: 
 
 Stop eating foods that are obviously high in refined sugar. E.g. soft drinks, cakes, lollies, biscuits, fruit juices, processed breakfast cereals and other sweet snacks. 
 Then progressively cut out high GI foods, i.e. carbohydrates that convert to glucose quickly. E.g. white bread, pasta, pastry, white flour and starchy vegetables such as potatoes, corn, parsnips 
 Aim to replace the above mentioned foods with low GI equivalents; this will help satisfy that sweet tooth as your diet is transitioning. E.g. cherries, grapefruit, apples, pears, strawberries, grapes, oranges and kiwifruit 
 When eating low GI fruits try combining them with a handful of raw nuts and seeds or a tub of good quality yoghurt. This helps keep blood sugar and energy levels in balance 
 If you must have a sweet thing, have one or two bites to satisfy the craving, enjoy it and move on 
 Aim to sleep well. Inadequate sleep has been associated with increased insulin resistance and fatigue can cause you to reach for sugary foods for an energy boost 
 Try using natural sweeteners such as Stevia or the sugar alcohols (e.g. xylitol, erytritol, maltitol). When baking try using agave syrup, it is a cactus derived low GI sweetener that is a good alternative to honey or maple syrup. 

 
Sugars to Avoid 
 
 White sugar 
 Brown sugar 
 Fructose 
 Raw sugar 
 Maple syrup 
 Honey (Yellow Box is a low GI alternative) 
 Glucose 
 Sucrose 
 Corn syrup 
 
Over a week or two you will find yourself craving sweet things less and your energy and mood should lift and improve. Once blood sugar levels are consistently stable, hormones and other glands will also stabilise and you will find yourself not turning to sugar to override the physical effects of hormonal fluctuations if they arise. 
 
Article Contributed by Susan Hunter 

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How to Quit Sugar

How to Quit Sugar

Need to get the sugar out of your diet? Here`s how.

Sugar addiction is such an integral part of our society that we don`t even have a word (like "alcoholic", "chocaholic" or "workaholic") to describe people addicted to sugar. "Eaters" are addicted to sugar, but you can eat without sugar. So I`m inventing a new word for sugar addicts: "sugarholics". Sugarholics today are in the same position that smokers were in the 1950s.

You used to be able to smoke any time at work. You didn`t have to stop work and stand alone in the middle of a field. You weren`t vilified for lighting up a cigarette in a restaurant. Quite the opposite; if you didn`t smoke, you were the weirdo. Today, sugarholics rule the roost. Everybody is addicted from birth. Not eating the birthday cake in the tearoom marks you out as the weirdo. Make no mistake: the task you are about to undertake will not be easy, but it is not an exercise in willpower.

Despite what everybody tells you, if you are a sugarholic, you do not have a personality defect. You are not a glutton. You are not weak-willed. You are chemically addicted to a substance in the food supply called fructose. And until you treat that addiction as the powerful biochemical force that it is, you will never loosen its grip. There are five steps to breaking your addiction. 

Have the right attitude

There are lots of downsides to sugar addiction and the only upside is that you feel normal when you have a hit. Do you really have cause to feel deprived? No, but willpower diets demand that you feel deprived. They ask you to "go without" and to "give up" a treat. Feeling deprived will simply drive you back into the arms of addiction.

If you want to succeed, you mustn`t feel you are being deprived of anything. You need to take pity on the poor hopeless addicts who are all around you ingesting poison. You need to view any offering of sugar not as a temptation to be overcome, but as an attempt to poison you (perhaps a little extreme, but you get the idea).

So, don`t feel deprived. You are not giving up anything. You are simply stopping a dangerous and harmful addiction. It really is that simple to break an addiction. If you have the right attitude, staying sugar-free becomes a lot easier than you could possibly imagine.

Stop habits associated with eating sugar

A critical step in breaking your sugar addiction is identifying the habits associated with the addiction. For me, watching TV was a means of relaxation, and it still is. But my sugar addiction had infiltrated that pleasurable experience and made it its own. Sugar had become an integral part of the relaxation process.

The pleasure I gained from watching TV was directly associated, in my mind, with the dopamine hit I got from the sugar. It`s possible to disassociate the two activities, but you won`t do it by abstaining from both using willpower. The trouble with addictions is that they frequently attach themselves to otherwise-pleasurable experiences and it becomes impossible to distinguish the two.

Those habits will really test your resolve because of the strong association, and in some cases the strong peer group pressure (such as at birthday parties, Easter and Christmas) to conform. In many instances, the only rational way to deal with the problem is to avoid the habitual events associated with consuming sugar until you break the addiction.

So, if you are in the habit of relaxing in front of the TV with a chocolate at the end of the day, stop watching TV and find some other way to relax in the evening for the next month. Or you could continue your TV habit but replace the chocolate with nuts, for example.

Eliminate sugar from your food supply

This step is all about giving you the shopping strategies you need to prevent too much fructose from contaminating your food supply. You are going to need some shelf space for all your fructose-free food, so the first thing you need to do is throw out all the food in your pantry and fridge that is too high in fructose.

Chocolate of any description must be sent to a happier hunting ground. The same goes for anything you picked up in the confectionery aisle at the supermarket. Sweet biscuits are slightly less bad than confectionery. To make your cupboards truly fructose free, all the sweet biscuits should go in the bin.

The only drinks you should have in your cupboard or fridge are unflavoured water and unflavoured milk. If you prefer your water with bubbles, then by all means have unflavoured mineral water or soda water. Alcoholic drinks are okay for the recovering sugarholic as long as they don`t taste sweet and they are not mixed with other drinks that contain sugar.

You can keep the dry wines, beers and spirits, but you need to toss out the dessert wines, ports, sweet Sherries, liqueurs and mixers (unless they are diet mixers). If you see honey or sultanas in the name of a cereal, it`s usually a good idea to check the sugar content carefully. Don`t be fooled by the branding of new ranges of flavoured oat cereals, either. Unlike their unflavoured cousins, they are usually extremely high in sugar.

Withdraw from sugar

Walt Disney once said, "The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing." And that is the point at which we have arrived on our mission to break your sugar addiction. There`s nothing fun about the withdrawal period, but it does end. And once it does, you`ll be completely free from the desire to eat sugar ever again. A plate of bikkies will hold all the attraction of a plate of raw broccoli.

If you are going cold turkey, have one last supper of your favourite sugary treat. Get that Mars Bar or that can of Coke. Sit down and consciously enjoy the very last time in your life that you will eat (or drink) sugar. If you can just get past the next few weeks of danger, you will enjoy the health that sugar has sucked from your life to date. Then, all of a sudden, your desire for sugar will vanish. I know it sounds strange, but it just plain goes. Bang! And you will never want the stuff again.

Re-stock and live your life

Once you start the sugar withdrawal, you`ll need to re-stock your now-bare cupboard.

Fruit: Whole fruits do contain fructose (the addictive and harmful half of sugar) – in some cases, very large amounts. But they also contain a fairly large amount of fibre and water.

Vegetables: There is no such thing as a bad vegetable. All vegetables contain some level of fructose, but it is an insignificant amount and is vastly overwhelmed by the fibre content.

Nuts: Like vegetables, there`s no such thing as a bad nut. Some have more fructose than others, but even the worst of them, from a fructose perspective, have huge amounts of fibre.

Meat: Meat does not contain any sugar, so knock yourself out. The only possible word of caution is around some of the fancy marinated meats. The marinade is usually very high in sugar and this type of product should generally be avoided.

Eggs, yoghurt, milk and cream: Only choose the tartest of European and natural yoghurts and avoid flavoured milk or whipped cream that you buy in a can.

Cheese: Cheese will have sugar on the ingredients list, but it is all lactose, so there`s no need for concern.

Bread: All breads contain some sugar. All of the standard unflavoured white breads lie somewhere between 0.5 and four per cent sugar (two per cent fructose). Multigrain and brown (wholemeal and rye) breads are low-sugar and have approximately twice as much fibre. 

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Know your Sugar Part 1

Know your Sugar Part 1

The History of Sugar 
It is believed that cane sugar was discovered before the birth of Christ. As early as 500 B.C., India was said to have a reed which gives honey without bees.? This reed would later become known as sugar cane. The invasion of Arabs into India nearly 1,000 years later in 642 A.D. led to the spread of sugar cane to the rest of the world. The Arabs discovered sugar cane and learned how the Indians processed it. They brought the cane with them as they conquered much of Europe, introducing it to lands such as North Africa and Spain. For many years, however, the rest of Europe was stuck with honey, because sugar did not make it to the west until the crusades. The first record of sugar in England occurs in the year 1099. 

There are two types of sugars 
Sugar is a simple carbohydrate. There are two types of sugars – monosaccharides, which include glucose, fructose and galactose, are made of one sugar molecule, and disaccharides are made of two sugar molecules linked together. Disaccharides are formed when monosaccharides combine – for example, when glucose and fructose are combined, they form sucrose, also known as table sugar. Other disaccharides include maltose, dextrose and lactose. When many sugar molecules are linked together, they form a complex carbohydrate, also known as a starch. Sugar provides the sweet flavour to foods to which it has been added, and it may also act as a preservative and flavour enhancer. Sugar is used in a variety of foods, including cookies, cakes, pickles, ice cream, alcohol and jams and jellies. Types of sugar include raw sugar, brown sugar, honey, molasses, maple sugar and corn syrup. Sugar gives the body energy, but too much sugar is unhealthy. Sugar, provides 16 calories per teaspoon, but provides no vitamins and minerals, so it`s a good idea to use it in moderation. Overconsumption of sugar, like other carbohydrates, has been linked to the development of cavities. However, sugar consumption has not been linked to hyperactivity in children. A high intake of sugar does not cause diabetes, but if a person is diagnosed with diabetes the amount of simple sugar eaten daily often needs to be reduced. The body actually uses all sugars the same way- it changes them to glucose, which is what our body uses for energy. However, in order to get long-lasting energy for your body, you need to eat more complex sugars (or carbohydrates) such as whole grain products. Eating too many simple sugars, like from soda or sweets, gives you quick energy or a sugar high which is quickly gone, leaving you feeling sluggish. You can avoid eating too much sugar by being smart and knowing how to find it on a label. 

Find sugar in ingredients listings by looking for those at the end. 

Examples: 
Glucose- fruits, vegetables, honey, milk, cereal 
Fructose- fruits, vegetables, honey 
Galactose- milk products 
Sucrose- fruits, vegetables, table sugar 
Lactose- milk products 
Maltose- malt products, cereal Dextrose 
There are many other names of sugars you need to be aware of such as: 
Invert Sugar, Mannitol, Sorbitol, corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, maltodextrins, granulated sugar, and 
Xylitol. Added sugars can come from corn, beet, grape or sugar cane, which are processed before being 
added to foods. Sugars can also be naturally occurring (in fruit) or added (in soda). 
If you can take a few minutes to read nutrition labels amid the chaos of family grocery shopping, you will 
find sugar as an ingredient in a surprising number of foods like peanut butter, canned tomatoes, salsa, 
canned chicken soup, deli-meats and pancake mix. Many juices and beverages also contain sugar. 

DID YOU KNOW??? 
One 350ml can of Coke has 39 grams of sugar!!! That is about 10 teaspoons, which is your entire daily limit 
of sugar!!! 
Soda is the number one source of sugar in the U.S. diet, and other sweetened drinks are not too far behind.  Foods with added sugars are often high in calories and low in nutrition. Too much of these foods can lead to excessive weight gain.

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