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Egg Allergy Prevalence

Egg Allergy Prevalence

Prevalence 
Egg allergy is one of the most prevalent allergies in children, being 1.6 – 3.2% (1). Egg allergy presentation is less common in older children and the adult population, which has prevalence between 1 – 1.6% (1). A child with an egg allergy will have an increased risk of dust mite allergy and asthma in the next couple of years after diagnosis (2). Children with an egg allergy may also develop peanut or other nut allergy (2). The window of opportunity for an egg allergy to develop is up until the first year of life (2). This may start prior to birth as the egg protein can cross the placental barrier and induce specific immune responses in the foetus (1), (2). Egg sensitization can also occur through breast milk (1). The sensitization to egg can be avoided in most cases if the maternal diet is free from egg from 
the later part of the pregnancy and for the first year of the child’s life (2). Often the first exposure to egg is when the child commences eating foods, usually after eating baby custard, scrambled egg, touching an egg in the egg carton, or tasting a raw cake mixture (1), (2). In the older children a reaction may occur after the consumption of foods containing uncooked egg, including ice cream, sorbet, mayonnaise, custard, and egg sandwiches (2). 

Clinical Presentation 
The most common clinical presentation of egg allergy is eczema in children between 6 – 15 months (2). 
Other presentations include urticaria, angio-oedema, anaphylaxis, acute vomiting, violent diarrhoea, colitis, with the gastrointestinal symptoms being less defined (1). Most egg allergic children have a natural aversion to egg (2). Highly allergic adults may experience nausea or a flare in eczema (2). Most adults with egg allergy have a natural aversion to egg and are able to eat egg if it is a minor ingredient in a food (2). Hen eggs and eggs from other birds have the same protein and can also illicit reactions in egg allergic individuals (2). 

By Julie Albrecht, Consultant Dietician Nutritionist A.P.D. 

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Hidden Egg Dangers in Everyday  Foods

Hidden Egg Dangers in Everyday Foods

Grains, bread, cereals and pasta: Egg pasta, macaroni, noodles 
 
Meat, fish, poultry and alternatives: All food made with or containing eggs such as battered or crumbed foods (such as fritters, schnitzel), frittatas, hamburgers, omelettes, quiche, rissoles or meat loaf, sausages, surimi (minced fish) and other bird eggs, such as duck or goose eggs 
 
Snack foods: pretzels 
 
Sauces, condiments, dressings and soups: béarnaise, Caesar salad and Ranch dressing, commercial soups, hollandaise, mayonnaise, tartare sauce 
 
Desserts and confectionery: Custard, frozen desserts, ice-cream, marzipan, marshmallows, meringues, mousse, nougat, pancakes, pavlova mix, pikelets, sorbet, waffles 
 
Baked goods: Biscuits, cakes, cheese cake, doughnuts, glazed pastries and breads, macaroons, slices, souffles, spinach pie 
 
Beverages and alcohol: Eggnog, malted drinks, milk drink mixes, wine 
 
Takeaway meals: Caesar salad, fried chicken, fried rice 
 
Other: Baking powder, egg lecithin. 
 
Read Food labels for the following egg-based 
ingredients: 
 Albumin 
 Dried egg 
 Egg protein 
 Egg white 
 Egg white solids 
 Egg yolk 
 Egg solids 
 Globulin 
 Livetin 
 Lysozyme 
 Mayonnaise 
 Meringue 
 ovalbumin 
 Ovoglobulim 
 Ovomucin 
 Ovomucold 
 Ovotransferrin 
 Ovovitella 
 Ovovitellin 
 Powdered egg 
 Silici Albuminate 
 Simplesse 
 Vitellin 
 Whole egg 

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5 Tips for living with an Egg Allergy

5 Tips for living with an Egg Allergy

You would think that the simplest approach to treating egg allergy is you just don’t eat eggs.5 tips for living with an egg allergy

But, so many foods are made with eggs and egg products that it can be really hard to know what’s OK and not OK to eat.

Tips for Living With an Egg Allergy 

1. It’s a good idea to work with a registered dietician to develop an eating plan that provides all the nutrients you need while avoiding things you can’t eat.

2. If you have a severe egg allergy — or any kind of serious allergy — your doctor may want you to carry a shot of epinephrine (pronounced: eh-puh-neh-frin) with you in case of an emergency. Epinephrine comes in an easy-to-carry container about the size of a large marker. It’s easy to use — your doctor will show you how.

3. If you accidentally eat something with egg in it and start having serious allergic symptoms, like swelling inside your mouth, chest pain, or difficulty breathing, you can give yourself the shot right away to counteract the reaction while you’re waiting for medical help. Always call for emergency help (011) when using epinephrine. You should make sure your school and even good friends’ houses have injectable epinephrine on hand, too.

4. Keeping epinephrine on hand at all times should be just part of your action plan for living with an egg allergy. It’s also a good idea to carry an over-the-counter antihistamine as this can help alleviate allergy symptoms in some people. Antihistamines should be used in addition to the epinephrine and not as a replacement for the shot.

5. If you’ve had to take an epinephrine shot because of an allergic reaction, then you should go immediately to a medical facility or hospital emergency room so they can give you additional treatment if you need it. Up to one third of anaphylactic reactions can have a second wave of symptoms several hours following the initial attack. Therefore, you might need to be observed in a clinic or hospital for 4 to 8 hours following the reaction.

Reference: Kids Health.org

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