Living With an Egg Allergy

Living With an Egg Allergy

The best way to be sure a food is egg free is to read the label. Manufacturers of foods sold in the Australia must list on their labels whether a food contains any of the most common allergens. This means that you should be able to find statements like these somewhere on the label: "contains egg ingredients," "made using egg ingredients," or "made in a facility that also processes eggs."

These label requirement makes things a little easier than reading the ingredients list — instead of needing to know that the ingredient "ovoglobulin" comes from egg protein, you should be able to tell at a glance which foods to avoid. Still, to make sure the foods you eat are egg free, you'll need to be on the lookout for any ingredients that might come from eggs. That means asking questions when eating out at restaurants or at a friend's home and carefully reading food labels.

When you eat in a restaurant or at a friend's house, call ahead before hand to establish how foods are cooked and what's in them. In some cases, you may want to bring your own food with you. When you're shopping, look for egg-free alternatives to foods that usually contain eggs, such as pasta.

Be aware that egg yolks are sometimes used to glaze pretzels, bagels, and other baked items.  Eggs are also often used as a foaming agent in beer, lattes, or cappuccinos.  Even some makeup, shampoos and medicines contain egg proteins.

People with an egg allergy may find that the health food section of the grocery store offers the most options. That's where you'll find vegan foods that are made without eggs or egg products.

 

Read more Egg Free articles

Source Egg Free recipes

Search our pantries for Egg Free Products 

How Can Doctors Diagnose If a Person Has an Egg Allergy?

Eggs are among the most common food allergens. Along with peanuts, tree nuts, sesame seeds, soy, milk, fish, including crustaceans and shellfish, wheat and other cereal grains containing gluten, and sulphites.

If you suspect that you or someone in your family has an allergy to a particular substance it is vital that you get an allergy test conducted.  There are a variety of methods but here we look at the medical alternatives you can have offered to you via your local GP.  Your doctor will probably refer you to an allergist or allergy specialist for further testing. The specialist will ask you questions that may cover things like how often you have the reaction, the time it takes between eating a particular food and the start of the symptoms, and whether any family members have allergies or conditions like eczema and asthma.  It is a great tip to do a food diary in the few weeks leading up to the appointment, which you may have to wait a great deal of time for, and write down any symptoms beside the various days.  This will be of great benefit to finding out which food may be the culprit.

 

Types of tests:

  • One form of testing is by performing a skin test.  This test involves placing liquid extracts of egg protein on a person's forearm or back, pricking the skin a tiny bit, and waiting to see if a reddish, raised spot forms, indicating an allergic reaction. This is easy to do and not so intrusive especially for a child. As a tip stop taking anti-allergy medications, cold medications and antidepressants several days prior to conducting the skin test so they don’t interfere with the results.  The allergist should be able to assist you with this prior to your appointment.

 

  • Blood samples are another form of testing which can be used by your local GP. They send it to a lab where it will be mixed with some of the suspected allergen and checked for IgE antibodies. In some cases, however, positive results of skin and blood tests aren’t enough to prove that a person’s symptoms are definitely being caused by eggs. So doctors may use what’s called a food challenge to help diagnose the allergy.

 

  • A food challenge is another form of identifying whether in this case egg is causing the reactions. The person is told to not eat eggs or anything made with egg proteins for a certain period of time — usually a few weeks. After that, the person will eat foods that contain eggs only under close supervision from a doctor. If symptoms come back after eating egg products, it's a pretty sure bet the person

 

Read more Egg Free articles

Source Egg Free recipes

Search our pantries for Egg Free Products 

Egg Allergen Card

Egg Allergen Card

If you are allergic to egg you might think it is a straight forward ingredient to avoid.  Unfortunately egg can have many other names and if you are not familiar with them you could end up introuble.

The Egg Ellergen Card shows the different names that egg can be shown as on ingredients lists as well as some prominent foods that you will need to avoid or double check the ingredients:

Read more Egg Free articles

Source Egg Free recipes

Search our pantries for Egg Free Products 

Top Substitutions for Eggs in Your Cooking

Top Substitutions for Eggs in Your Cooking

Replacing eggs in cooking can be tricky, they provide flavour and binding; here are our top substitutions for eggs in your cooking:

 

1 Egg Equals Use Notes
1/2 Banana, mashed Pancakes, Cakes, Breads Very ripe bananas will add sweetness
1/4 cup Applesauce or 1/4 cup ripe mashed pears Breads, Cakes, Brownies Avoid using more than 1/4 cup total in any recipe
1/4 cup natural or Greek Yoghurt Brownies, Smoothies Can cause final product to be heavier
2.5 Tablespoons ground Flax mixed with 3 tablespoons water, set in fridge for 10 minutes Granola Bars, Smoothies Adds earthy, nutty taste and chewy texture
1 tablespoon coconut oil mixed with 2 teaspoons baking powder and 2 teaspoons water Gluten Free Baking Adds fat to the recipe, can be tricky to work with
1 tablespoon chia seeds mixed with 3 tablespoons water, set in fridge for 10 minutes Smoothies, Baked Goods Binds and thickens
1/4 cup pureed prunes (or any high pectin fruit) Breads, Cakes, Brownies Adds sweetness to recipe
1/4 cup pumpkin, mashed (canned works week, choose BPA free cans) Breads, Brownies Can be heavy
1/4 cup potato, cooked and mashed 9sweet potato might be yum!) Savoury dishes Can be heavy
1 tablespoon agar mixed with 1 tablespoon water, whipped and chilled Gluten Free Baking Used to replace egg whites only
1 tablespoon gelatine dissolved in 1 tablespoon cold water, add 2 tablespoons boiling water, beat vigorously until frothy Gluten Free Baking Binds and thickens

 

Read more Egg Free articles

Source Egg Free recipes

Search our pantries for Egg Free Products 

Watch out for these ingredients on an Egg Free diet

Watch out for these ingredients on an Egg Free diet

The following ingredients are or may contain eggs.

Avoid these ingredients and all types of eggs (eg. hen, duck and goose) if following an egg-free diet

Albumen Glaze (in baked goods, eg pies, buns)
Apovitellin Globulin
Avidin Imitation egg products
Dried eggs Livetin
Egg, whole Lysozyme
Egg albumen Meringue Mix
Egg lecithin (E322)* Ovalbumin
Egg solids  Ovglycoprotein
Egg white and solids  Ovomucin, ovomucoid, ovomuxoid
Egg yolk Powdered egg
Flavoproteins  

*Lecithin may be derived from egg but rarely causes an adverse food reaction. Check with your doctor

or dietician.

Egg Allergy – Management

Egg Allergy – Management

The cornerstone of management of egg allergy is the avoidance of all egg and egg containing products (1). 

Children who are highly allergic to egg may react when they are in a kitchen when eggs are being fried, being in the next room when a pavlova is being prepared, being touched by an individual who has been handling raw egg even after hand washing or even when sitting next to someone who is eating egg (2). However, some patients may tolerate cooked egg and even small amounts of raw egg (1). It is important to find other dietary alternatives which provide a source of high biological value protein, vitamins B1 B2 + Folic Acid + Vitamin E and fats (2). Indicators of the beginning of the resolution of egg reactivity, is usually seen through the tolerance of small amounts of cooked egg (1). This may progress to all forms of egg, though this is not always the case (1). Generally 50% Egg Allergic Children are tolerant by the age of 3 years and 66% by the age of 5 years. An oral food challenge may be warranted to confirm results, though this will be dependent on IgE and skin prick testing (1). 

Foods that list any of these ingredients on their labels need to be avoided in patients with Egg Allergy: 

(1), (2) 
Egg/fresh egg (including those from all birds) 
Egg powder, dried egg, frozen egg, pasteurised egg 
Egg proteins (albumin, ovalbumin, globulin, ovoglobulin, livetin, ovomucin, vitellin, Ovovitellin) 
Egg white, egg yolk 
Egg lecithin, dried egg, powdered egg 
Classifications of egg-containing foods: 
(1) (2) 
 
Well-cooked Egg: 
 
Cakes, Biscuits, Dried and well cooked fresh egg pasta, Egg in sausages and prepared meat dishes, Egg glaze on pastry, Sponge fingers, Quorn, Nougat, Milky Way, Mars bar, Chewits, Egg in some gravy granules, Dried egg noodles 
 
Loosely cooked Egg: 
Meringues, Lemon curd, Quiche, Scrambled egg, Boiled egg, Fried egg, Omelette, Poached egg, Egg in batter, Egg in breadcrumbs, Hollandaise sauce, Egg custard, Pancakes and Yorkshire Pudding (some patients who can eat well-cooked egg can tolerate these, but it depends on how well cooked they are and if they contain any `sticky` batter inside). 
 
Raw Egg: 
Fresh mousse, Fresh Mayonnaise, Fresh ice cream, Fresh sorbet, Royal icing (both homemade Royal icing and commercial Powdered icing-sugar mix), Horseradish sauce, Tartar sauce, Raw egg in cake mix and other dishes awaiting cooking (children of all ages love to taste!) `Frico` Edam cheese or other cheeses containing egg- white lysozyme, Wine and clear soups (egg white is used to get rid of cloudiness). Egg-free products: (1). Egg-free mayonnaise, Egg-free cakes and muffins, Egg-free puddings, Egg-free omelette mix, Egg replacers, Whole-egg replacers, Egg-white replacer, Whole egg replacer (allergycare), Ener-G egg replacer (General Dietary), Loprofin egg replacer (SHS International), No-egg replacer (Orgran), Loprofin egg white replacer (SHS International) 

Other Considerations for Managing Egg Allergy 

Non-food items such as medication can also contain traces of egg protein (1). Some vaccines may contain traces of egg derivatives, and this is an important consideration when the individual requires vaccination. Vaccines of significance include MMR; Yellow Fever; Influenza (1). The influenza vaccine is cultured in egg and may cause reactions in individuals with egg allergy (2). The MMR vaccine is cultured in tissue of the developing chicken embryo and has been safely administered to thousands of children with egg allergy, in rare circumstances a child may experience a rash after the injection (2). Other non-food items like cosmetics, toiletries and perfumes which contain traces of egg-derivatives should be avoided if they cause irritation (1). Indications of the labelling are often written as ovum or ovo (1). 

Article Contributed by Julie Albrecht. You may also be interested in Egg Allergy Prevalence

Read more Egg Free articles

Source Egg Free recipes

Search our pantries for Egg Free Products 

 

 

Page 1 of 212