kiwiBursting with the nutritional value of essential vitamins and minerals Zespri® Green and Gold Kiwifruit are now both in season!  Check out those Zespri® Gold Kiwifruit with their lusciously melon, peach and citrus flavours that continue to be popular.  But you’ll have to be quick as this season concludes in October.  They share space in green grocers and fresh produce sections of supermarkets with the tangy taste of Zespri® Green Kiwifruit, here until December.

Distinctly different in taste and appearance, the exceptional Zespri® Green and Gold Kiwifruit both deliver a wide variety of health benefits. In fact, Zespri® Kiwifruit is consistently ranked as one of the most nutrient-dense fruit available. Research has found that the high nutrient density of Kiwifruit is driven by its rich vitamin C2 content, supported by other key nutrients including fibre3, folate4, and vitamin E5.  The very good news is that just one Zespri® Kiwifruit a day can provide the daily requirement of vitamin C and may even help with the body’s uptake of iron. 6

Regular consumption of Zespri® Kiwifruit also contributes to good digestive health.  Kiwifruit is rich in fibre which can assist in reduced bloating as well as improving bowel habits, 7 and aiding the digestion of several food proteins including meat, milk, legumes and cereal. 8,9,10 Furthermore, eating just two Zespri® Kiwifruit a day has been proven to reduce the amount of oxidative damage to cells of the body, and improve the repair of damaged DNA, which is caused by free radicals and oxidative stress.11,12,13,14

The delicious fruit is also a natural source of potassium and one of the few foods that provide a natural source of folate. 15 Low in fat, they also have a low glycaemic index (GI) 16,17

So enjoy Zespri® Kiwifruit every day!  Simply cut the fruit in half and scoop out the soft flesh with a spoon or a spife, that combination spoon/knife created in New Zealand.

Ideal for a quick breakfast, a snack-on-the-run and children’s lunchboxes, Zespri® Kiwifruit are incredibly versatile. Why not blend them into a smoothie, dice them into a salsa, baked with chocolate into muffins and frozen as a sorbet…. there are just so many great recipe ideas using Zespri® Green and Gold Kiwifruit!

They’re certainly a daily scoop of amazing!!  So buy some today. For further information, go to www.zespri.com or like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ZespriKiwifruitOZ

For further information please contact Anne Tesch or Eliza Mielczarek, Tesch Communications anne@tesch.com.au,eliza@tesch.com.au 03 9690 9199

References

  1. US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2011. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 24
  2. European Commission (2102) EU register on nutrition and health claims. www.ec.europa.eu/nuhclaims (accessed 22 June 2012).
  3. Han, K. S., P. Balan, et al. (2011). “Green kiwifruit modulates the colonic microbiota in growing pigs.” Letters in Applied Microbiology 52(4): 379-385.
  4. European Commission (2102) EU register on nutrition and health claims. www.ec.europa.eu/nuhclaims (accessed 22 June 2012).
  5. Du, G., M. Li, et al. (2009). “Antioxidant capacity and the relationship with polyphenol and Vitamin C in Actinidia fruits.” Food Chemistry 13(2): 557-562.
  6. European Commission (2102) EU register on nutrition and health claims. www.ec.europa.eu/nuhclaims (accessed 22 June 2012).
  7. Han, K. S., P. Balan, et al. (2011). “Green kiwifruit modulates the colonic microbiota in growing pigs.” Letters in Applied Microbiology 52(4): 379-385.
  8. Kaur, L., S. M. Rutherfurd, et al. (2010a). “Actinidin Enhances Gastric Protein Digestion As Assessed Using an in Vitro Gastric Digestion Model.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 58(8): 5068-5073.
  9. Kaur, L., S. M. Rutherfurd, et al. (2010b). “Actinidin Enhances Protein Digestion in the Small Intestine As Assessed Using an in Vitro Digestion Model.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 58(8): 5074-5080.
  10. Rutherfurd, S. M., C. A. Montoya, et al. (2011). “Effect of actinidin from kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. Hayward) on the digestion of food proteins determined in the growing rat.” Food Chemistry 129(4): 1684-1689.
  11. Brevik, A., A. Karlsen, et al. (2011). “Both base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair in humans are influenced by nutritional factors.” Cell Biochemistry and Function 29(1): 36-42.
  12. Collins, B. H., A. Horska, et al. (2001). “Kiwifruit Protects Against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Cells and In vitro.” Nutrition and Cancer 39(1): 148-153.
  13. Collins, A. R., V. Harrington, et al. (2003). “Nutritional modulation of DNA repair in a human intervention study.” Carcinogenesis 24(3): 511-515.
  14. Rush, E., L. R. Ferguson, et al. (2006). “Kiwifruit consumption reduces DNA fragility: a randomized controlled pilot study in volunteers.” Nutrition Research 26(5): 197-201.
  15. European Commission (2102) EU register on nutrition and health claims. www.ec.europa.eu/nuhclaims (accessed 22 June 2012).
  16. Chen, Y.-Y., Wu, P.-C., Weng, S.-F., & Liu, j.-F. (2011). Glycemia and peak incremental indices of six popular fruits in Taiwan: healthy and Type 2 diabetes subjects compared. Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, 49(3), 195-199. doi: 10.3164/jcbn.11-11
  17. Rush, E., & Drummond, L. N. (2009). The Glycaemic Index of Kiwifruit. New Zealand Kiwifruit Journal, 192 (May/June), 29-33.

 

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